How low can you go? Detection thresholds for small haptic effects.

Dosher, J. and Lee, G. and Hannaford, B. (2001) How low can you go? Detection thresholds for small haptic effects. In: Touch in Virtual Environments, Proceedings USC Workshop on Haptic Interfaces.

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Abstract

Can haptics be effective in low power and hand held applications? Inevitably a haptic device which meets the strict weight, power and volume requirements of a hand held device will be capable of only very small forces and displacements compared to existing desktop devices. This leads to two aspects to the question. What are the weakest haptic effects that can be effectively used by humans interacting with a haptic device? And how can haptic devices be designed to operate at or just above these low levels while maintaining both the weight, power and volume constraints and effective outputs? <p> This paper will describe experiments involving exploration of 1-D surface profiles using a single finger in the flexion extension plane and the (Finger-tip Haptic Display) FHD, a 2 DOF, low friction, direct drive, planar haptic display capable of high fidelity representation of virtual surfaces. Using a forced-choice experiment incorporating an adaptive threshold algorithm, we measured the weakest haptic effects that are detectable via the haptic interface. In the first experiment, the subject is presented with two targets 5 mm wide, spaced 10 mm apart, and located on a horizontal line. The haptic force on one randomly chosen target consists of a tangential force beginning at each edge of the target, and pointing inward, toward the target center. We use the converged adaptive force threshold value as characteristic of the smallest detectable haptic effects that can be communicated by our specific haptic device (FHD) to a specific subject. Data for 7 subjects indicates an average human/machine threshold of 30 mN.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Subjects: D Haptics
Divisions: Department of Electrical Engineering
Depositing User: Nava Aghdasi
Date Deposited: 12 Aug 2015 20:16
Last Modified: 12 Aug 2015 20:16
URI: http://brl.ee.washington.edu/eprints/id/eprint/257

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